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Chronic in vivo optogenetic stimulation modulates neuronal excitability, spine morphology, and Hebbian plasticity in the mouse hippocampus
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology. Leopoldo de Meis Institute of Medical Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7811-5383
Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Brain Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.
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2019 (English)In: Hippocampus, ISSN 1050-9631, E-ISSN 1098-1063, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 755-761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prolonged increases in excitation can trigger cell‐wide homeostatic responses in neurons, altering membrane channels, promoting morphological changes, and ultimately reducing synaptic weights. However, how synaptic downscaling interacts with classical forms of Hebbian plasticity is still unclear. In this study, we investigated whether chronic optogenetic stimulation of hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neurons in freely moving mice could (a) cause morphological changes reminiscent of homeostatic scaling, (b) modulate synaptic currents that might compensate for chronic excitation, and (c) lead to alterations in Hebbian plasticity. After 24 hr of stimulation with 15‐ms blue light pulses every 90 s, dendritic spine density and area were reduced in the CA1 region of mice expressing channelrhodopsin‐2 (ChR2) when compared to controls. This protocol also reduced the amplitude of mEPSCs for both the AMPA and NMDA components in ex vivo slices obtained from ChR2‐expressing mice immediately after the end of stimulation. Finally, chronic stimulation impaired the induction of LTP and facilitated that of LTD in these slices. Our results indicate that neuronal responses to prolonged network excitation can modulate subsequent Hebbian plasticity in the hippocampus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 29, no 8, p. 755-761
Keywords [en]
long-term depression, long-term potentiation, optogenetics, synaptic plasticity, synaptic scaling
National Category
Biophysics Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380035DOI: 10.1002/hipo.23080ISI: 000475815400008PubMedID: 30767318OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-380035DiVA, id: diva2:1298287
Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved

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Moulin, Thiago C.Lima da Cruz, Rafael V.

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