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Seasonal movements of killer whales between Iceland and Scotland
Marine Res Inst, IS-121 Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ St Andrews, Scottish Oceans Inst, Sea Mammal Res Unit, St Andrews KY16 8LB, Fife, Scotland..
Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Evolutionsbiologi. Uppsala Univ, Dept Evolutionary Biol, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Copenhagen, Ctr GeoGenet, Nat Hist Museum Denmark, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark..
2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: Aquatic Biology, ISSN 1864-7782, E-ISSN 1864-7790, Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 75-79Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the movements and distribution of killer whales Orcinus orca is important for evaluating the threats they face, as well as their impact as top predators in different ecosystems. Killer whales in the Northeast Atlantic are thought to follow specific prey stocks but their seasonal movements are still poorly understood. Here, we used recent killer whale photographic data collected in Iceland and Scotland to show that some individual whales repeatedly move between these locations. Unlike other killer whales that appear to follow the movements of particular herring stocks, the whales we studied appear to feed on the Icelandic summer-spawning herring stock in winter, and then move outside the summer distribution range of this herring stock. Based on these new photographic recaptures and previously published movements of killer whales between Iceland and Scotland, we infer that movements between both locations have been occurring for several years at least. Although based on only 7 identified individuals, our results provide the first evidence of regular seasonal movements between Iceland and Scotland, and suggest individual or group variability in the movement patterns of killer whales that prey on herring. Understanding killer whale movements will aid our understanding of prey specialization, the whales' potential impacts on local prey resources, and their susceptibility to fluctuations in the availability of different prey species.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2015. Vol. 24, nr 1, s. 75-79
Emneord [en]
Movements, Herring, Orcinus orca, Northeast Atlantic, Dietary specialization
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264339DOI: 10.3354/ab00637ISI: 000361045800009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-264339DiVA, id: diva2:860910
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-10-14 Laget: 2015-10-09 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-01bibliografisk kontrollert

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