uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Using predictor antennas for the prediction of small-scale fading provides an order-of-magnitude improvement of prediction horizons
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group.
AIRRAYS Wireless Solut Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Our aim is to investigate long range predictions (up to several wavelengths) of the small-scale fading of radio channels. The purpose is to enable advanced 5G downlink transmission schemes that require accurate channel state information at transmitters, such as massive MIMO and coherent joint transmission, for vehicular users. We here present a proof of concept for the recently introduced predictor antenna scheme which promises a significant increase in prediction horizon compared to conventional techniques. Predictor antennas utilize the exterior of moving vehicles by placing antenna arrays on top of their roofs. They are used to estimate the fading radio channels that are encountered later by the following antennas. The level of predictability is determined by the correlation between the channel measured at the predictor antenna and the channel that is later encountered by the following antennas when they move to that position. That correlation, and the resulting prediction errors, are assessed on a large set of measurement data sampled at vehicular velocities, at a carrier frequency of 2.53 GHz, from a multitude of urban fading environments. These represent a wide variety of propagation environments, including narrow and wide roads, intersections, dense urban environments and residential areas. Using low-pass filtered predictor antenna measurements, the obtained average prediction Normalized Mean Squared Error (NMSE) is -11 dB for prediction horizons of 0.25 wavelengths and -8.5 dB for horizons of 3 wavelengths. This represents an order of magnitude increase of the prediction horizons as compared to time-series prediction that typically, in practice, fails to work for prediction beyond 0.3 wavelengths in space. As a result, we have a tool that enables advanced 5G transmit schemes for vehicular users and vehicle-to-infrastructure links.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Telecommunications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330704ISI: 000464321500010ISBN: 978-1-5090-1525-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-330704DiVA, id: diva2:1146555
Conference
IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC, Workshop WDN-5G, Paris, Frankrike
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Björsell, JoachimSternad, Mikael

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Björsell, JoachimSternad, Mikael
By organisation
Signals and Systems Group
Telecommunications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 103 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf