uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Serotonin Coordinates Responses to Social Stress: What We Can Learn from Fish
Univ Koblenz Landau, Inst Integrated Nat Sci, Koblenz, Germany..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4252-3144
2017 (English)In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 11, article id 595Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social interaction is stressful and subordinate individuals are often subjected to chronic stress, which greatly affects both their behavior and physiology. In teleost fish the social position of an individual may have long-term effects, such as effects on migration, age of sexual maturation or even sex. The brain serotonergic system plays a key role in coordinating autonomic, behavioral and neuroendocrine stress responses. Social subordination results in a chronic activation of the brain serotonergic system an effect, which seems to be central in the subordinate phenotype. However, behavioral effects of short-term acute activation of the serotonergic system are less obvious. As in other vertebrates, divergent stress coping styles, often referred to as proactive and reactive, has been described in teleosts. As demonstrated by selective breeding, stress coping styles appear to be partly heritable. However, teleost fish are characterized by plasticity, stress coping style being affected by social experience. Again, the brain serotonergic system appears to play an important role. Studies comparing brain gene expression of fish of different social rank and/or displaying divergent stress coping styles have identified several novel factors that seem important for controlling aggressive behavior and stress coping, e.g., histamine and hypocretin/orexin. These may also interact with brain monoaminergic systems, including serotonin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 11, article id 595
Keywords [en]
arginine vasotocin (AVT), corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neurotransmitters, serotonin (5-HT), social behavior
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346787DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00595ISI: 000413640600001PubMedID: 29163002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-346787DiVA, id: diva2:1192450
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 221-2014-1842Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4679Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(959 kB)58 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 959 kBChecksum SHA-512
fdc8eb0c802ba51829799c9d1a8fef8aaa7743d43e1a2c51cd67c7f81d320e7ace4397d5d23667fbe5341836dc9426922771daac4bfb66f8a9b73d82b9a760db
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Winberg, Svante

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Winberg, Svante
By organisation
Physiology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Neuroscience
Neurosciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 58 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 244 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf