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Facets of Male Violence Against Women With Substance Abuse Problems: Women With a Residence and Homeless Women
Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, The Social Sciences of Religion, Psychology of Religions. Innlandet Hosp Trust, Publ Mental Hlth, Brumunddal, Norway.
Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Karolinska Inst, Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1391-1411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of this study were to investigate the type and extent to which women with substance abuse problems have been exposed to male violence during their lifetime, and to examine possible differences between women with a residence (WR) and homeless women (HW). The total sample included 79 women (WR, n = 35; HW, n = 44; M age = 47.8 years). Of the total sample, 72 women (91%) had experienced different kinds of male violence, 88% from former partners, and 26% from male friends or acquaintances. Of the 72 women, 71% further reported Countless occasions of violent events, and 36% had been forced to commit criminal acts. Abused women who had been forced to commit criminal acts were significantly more frequently found to be homeless, have reported parental alcohol and/or drug problems, have witnessed domestic violence in childhood, have been victims of sexual violence, have used illicit drugs as a dominant preparation, and have injected illicit drugs. Almost half of the abused women (46%) met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), where HW showed an almost 4-time higher risk (RR 3.78) than WR. In conclusion there is a particular vulnerability in women with substance abuse to male violence, which has an important impact on their health status. Thus, from a public health perspective, it is suggested that for those women who have experienced male violence, treatment protocols need to include both assessing and addressing the impact of such experience in relation to substance abuse as well as concomitant health concerns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC , 2018. Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1391-1411
Keywords [en]
substance abuse problems, male violence, homelessness, women with a residence, PTSD, criminal activity, public mental health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352576DOI: 10.1177/0886260515618211ISI: 000429878100001PubMedID: 26637590OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-352576DiVA, id: diva2:1237110
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved

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DeMarinis, Valerie

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