uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Platelets, NETs and cancer
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
2018 (English)In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 164, p. S148-S152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In addition to the central role of platelets in hemostasis, they contribute to pathological conditions such as inflammation and tumor progression. Aberrant expression and/or exposure of pro-coagulant factors in the tumor microenvironment induce platelet activation and subsequent release of growth factors from platelet granules. Cancer patients are commonly affected by thrombotic events, as a result of tumor-induced platelet activation. A novel player potentially contributing to cancer-associated thrombosis is the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are composed of externalized DNA of nuclear or mitochondrial origin, bound to histones and granular proteases such as neutrophil elastase (NE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). These extracellular traps help neutrophils to catch and kill pathogens such as bacteria, virus and fungi. It is now clear that NETs form also under conditions of sterile inflammation such as cancer and autoimmunity and can promote thrombosis. Recent data show that platelets play a key role in determining when and where NETs should form. This review will highlight our current insight in the role of platelets as regulators of NET formation, both during infection and sterile inflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2018. Vol. 164, p. S148-S152
Keywords [en]
Cancer, Thrombosis, Platelets, Neutrophil extracellular traps, NETs
National Category
Hematology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358569DOI: 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.01.049ISI: 000432889200027PubMedID: 29703474OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-358569DiVA, id: diva2:1248950
Conference
9th International Conference on Thrombosis and Hemostasis Issues in Cancer (ICTHIC), APR 13-15, 2018, Bergamo, ITALY
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-03036Swedish Cancer Society, 2017/522Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Cedervall, JessicaHamidi, AnahitaOlsson, Anna-Karin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Cedervall, JessicaHamidi, AnahitaOlsson, Anna-Karin
By organisation
Department of Medical Biochemistry and MicrobiologyScience for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab
In the same journal
Thrombosis Research
HematologyCancer and Oncology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 126 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf