uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Structure and function of the global topsoil microbiome.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0713-6897
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 560, no 7717, p. 233-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soils harbour some of the most diverse microbiomes on Earth and are essential for both nutrient cycling and carbon storage. To understand soil functioning, it is necessary to model the global distribution patterns and functional gene repertoires of soil microorganisms, as well as the biotic and environmental associations between the diversity and structure of both bacterial and fungal soil communities1-4. Here we show, by leveraging metagenomics and metabarcoding of global topsoil samples (189 sites, 7,560 subsamples), that bacterial, but not fungal, genetic diversity is highest in temperate habitats and that microbial gene composition varies more strongly with environmental variables than with geographic distance. We demonstrate that fungi and bacteria show global niche differentiation that is associated with contrasting diversity responses to precipitation and soil pH. Furthermore, we provide evidence for strong bacterial-fungal antagonism, inferred from antibiotic-resistance genes, in topsoil and ocean habitats, indicating the substantial role of biotic interactions in shaping microbial communities. Our results suggest that both competition and environmental filtering affect the abundance, composition and encoded gene functions of bacterial and fungal communities, indicating that the relative contributions of these microorganisms to global nutrient cycling varies spatially.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 560, no 7717, p. 233-237
National Category
Microbiology Evolutionary Biology Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360977DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0386-6ISI: 000441115200048PubMedID: 30069051OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-360977DiVA, id: diva2:1249747
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05019The Royal Swedish Academy of SciencesHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse EU, Horizon 2020, 686070Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Bahram, MohammadAnderson, Jennifer LRyberg, Martin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bahram, MohammadAnderson, Jennifer LRyberg, Martin
By organisation
Systematic Biology
In the same journal
Nature
MicrobiologyEvolutionary BiologyEcologyEnvironmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 114 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf