uu.seUppsala universitets publikasjoner
Endre søk
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Impact of the West Africa Ebola Outbreak on Obstetric Health Care in Sierra Leone.
Vise andre og tillknytning
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 2, artikkel-id e0150080Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: As Sierra Leone celebrates the end of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, we can begin to fully grasp its impact on already weak health systems. The EVD outbreak in West Africa forced many hospitals to close down or reduce their activity, either to prevent nosocomial transmission or because of staff shortages. The aim of this study is to assess the potential impact of EVD on nationwide access to obstetric care in Sierra Leone.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: Community health officers collected weekly data between January 2014-May 2015 on in-hospital deliveries and caesarean sections (C-sections) from all open facilities (public, private for-profit and private non-profit sectors) offering emergency obstetrics in Sierra Leone. This was compared to official data of EVD cases per district. Logistic and Poisson regression analyses were used to compute risk and rate estimates. Nationwide, the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections decreased by over 20% during the EVD outbreak. The decline occurred early on in the EVD outbreak and was mainly attributable to the closing of private not-for-profit hospitals rather than government facilities. Due to difficulties in collecting data in the midst of an epidemic, limitations of this study include some missing data points.

CONCLUSIONS: Both the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections substantially declined shortly after the onset of the EVD outbreak. Since access to emergency obstetric care, like C-sections, is associated with decreased maternal mortality, many women are likely to have died due to the reduced access to appropriate care during childbirth. Future research on indirect health effects of health system breakdown should ideally be nationwide and continue also into the recovery phase. It is also important to understand the mechanisms behind the deterioration so that important health services can be reestablished.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2016. Vol. 11, nr 2, artikkel-id e0150080
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364542DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150080PubMedID: 26910462OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-364542DiVA, id: diva2:1259335
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-10-29 Laget: 2018-10-29 Sist oppdatert: 2019-02-28bibliografisk kontrollert

Open Access i DiVA

fulltext(1080 kB)51 nedlastinger
Filinformasjon
Fil FULLTEXT01.pdfFilstørrelse 1080 kBChecksum SHA-512
40fe074741a2d2f48be366e8361b816c8f1850e5bbd53c4050cec3c74653eba9ca97b8cc4bfba9fd0526ad4dafc3807c3ef56ae9611273f5ab8737f37e7de772
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Andre lenker

Forlagets fulltekstPubMed

Personposter BETA

Darj, Elisabeth

Søk i DiVA

Av forfatter/redaktør
Darj, Elisabeth
Av organisasjonen
I samme tidsskrift
PLoS ONE

Søk utenfor DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Totalt: 51 nedlastinger
Antall nedlastinger er summen av alle nedlastinger av alle fulltekster. Det kan for eksempel være tidligere versjoner som er ikke lenger tilgjengelige

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Totalt: 141 treff
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf