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What makes registered nurses remain in work? An ethnographic study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. (Hälso- och sjukvårdsforskning, Health Services Research)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4302-5529
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Services Research. Department of Emergency Care and Internal Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Nursing, University of Adelaide, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7221-2876
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 89, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Registered nurses' work-related stress, dissatisfaction and burnout are some of the problems in the healthcare and that negatively affect healthcare quality and patient care. A prerequisite for sustained high quality at work is that the registered nurses are motivated. High motivation has been proved to lead to better working results. The theory of inner work life describes the dynamic interplay between a person's perceptions, emotions and motivation and the three key factors for a good working life: nourishment, progress and catalysts. Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore registered nurses' workday events in relation to inner work life theory, to better understand what influences registered nurses to remain in work. Design: A qualitative explorative study with an ethnographic approach. Methods: Participant observation over four months; in total 56 h with 479 events and 58 informal interviews during observation; all registered nurses employed at the unit (n = 10) were included. In addition, individual interviews were conducted after the observation period (n = 9). The dataset was analysed using thematic analysis and in the final step of the analysis the categories were reflected in relation to the three key factors in theory of inner work life. Results: Nourishment in a registered nurse context describes the work motivation created by the interpersonal support between colleagues. It was important to registered nurses that physicians and colleagues respected and trusted their knowledge in the daily work, and that they felt comfortable asking questions and supporting each other. Progress in the context of registered nurses' work motivation was the feeling of moving forward with a mix of small wins and the perception of solving more complex challenges in daily work. It was also fundamental to the registered nurses' development through new knowledge and learning during daily work. Catalysts, actions that directly facilitate the work, were highlighted as the possibility to work independently along with the opportunity to work together with other registered nurses. Conclusion: This study has a number of implications for future work and research on creating an attractive workplace for registered nurses. Working independently, with colleagues from the same profession, integrated with learning, visible progress, and receiving feedback from the work itself, contribute to work motivation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 89, p. 32-38
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Care Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364722DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.09.008ISI: 000454965700006PubMedID: 30339953OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-364722DiVA, id: diva2:1260052
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved

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Ahlstedt, CarinaEriksson Lindvall, CarinHolmström, IngerMuntlin Athlin, Åsa

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