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Practice Patterns of Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Pediatrics: Results From an International Pediatric Research Consortium
Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
Johns Hopkins Sch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Mol Radiat Sci, Baltimore, MD USA.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of pediatric hematology/oncology (Print), ISSN 1077-4114, E-ISSN 1536-3678, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 522-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose/Objectives: There is little consensus regarding the application of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) in pediatrics. We evaluated patterns of pediatric SRT practice through an international research consortium. Materials and Methods: Eight international institutions with pediatric expertise completed a 124-item survey evaluating patterns of SRT use for patients 21 years old and younger. Frequencies of SRT use and median margins applied with and without SRT were evaluated. Results: Across institutions, 75% reported utilizing SRT in pediatrics. SRT was used in 22% of brain, 18% of spine, 16% of other bone, 16% of head and neck, and <1% of abdomen/pelvis, lung, and liver cases across sites. Of the hypofractionated SRT cases, 42% were delivered with definitive intent. Median gross tumor volume to planning target volume margins for SRT versus non-SRT plans were 0.2 versus 1.4 cm for brain, 0.3 versus 1.5 cm for spine/other bone, 0.3 versus 2.0 cm for abdomen/pelvis, 0.7 versus 1.5 cm for head and neck, 0.5 versus 1.7 cm for lung, and 0.5 versus 2.0 cm for liver sites. Conclusions: SRT is commonly utilized in pediatrics across a range of treatment sites. Margins used for SRT were substantially smaller than for non-SRT planning, highlighting the utility of this approach in reducing treatment volumes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018. Vol. 40, no 7, p. 522-526
Keywords [en]
pediatric stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367409DOI: 10.1097/MPH.0000000000001290ISI: 000446191900024PubMedID: 30247288OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-367409DiVA, id: diva2:1267657
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved

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