uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Constructing the Suburb: Swedish Discourses of Spatial Stigmatisation
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

By exploring representations of place, this thesis treats practices of spatial stigmatisation in the context of segregated Swedish cities. In three papers, different aspects of stigmatisation and place-making are discussed and analysed, where the overarching ambition is to identify and critically deconstruct the ideology behind stigma as well as suggest ways of making representation positive. In other words, this thesis takes issue with the negative labels attached to certain urban areas by exploring dominant discursive trends and mechanisms, or techniques, of creating spatial stigma.

Theoretically, the analysis is informed by postcolonial critical research on segregation and representations of people and place, where place-making is of particular importance. The case study consists of printed news media and political discourse concerning stigmatised urban areas in Sweden, and the method is inspired by critical discourse analysis.

The empirical material covers a period of twenty years, and the analysis is particularly focused on constructions of ‘race’ and poverty and how these two dimensions intertwine. The main findings point to a dominant trend of representing stigmatised neighbourhoods as failed and miserable places that are not considered part of Sweden. They become racialised both through representations of the neighbourhoods as foreign and unintegrated places and through representations of the residents, usually categorised as the ‘immigrants’, as culturally different from ‘Swedes’.  There are signs of a more critical discourse which challenges the negative representations, but it remains weak compared to the predominance of the negative reporting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Department of Social and Economic Geography , 2019. , p. 93
Series
Geographica, ISSN 0431-2023 ; 21
Keywords [en]
Spatial stigmatisation, segregation, representation, suburb, discourse
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373397ISBN: 978-91-506-2742-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-373397DiVA, id: diva2:1278527
Public defence
2019-03-08, Sal IX, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, 753 10, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-02-22
List of papers
1. Mechanisms of media stigmatisation: Colonial discourse and the racialisation of Swedish suburbs
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanisms of media stigmatisation: Colonial discourse and the racialisation of Swedish suburbs
(English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Using Sweden and Swedish newspapers as our case, we analyse 16 years of news reports on stigmatised areas. Particular attention is paid to what we refer to as mechanisms of stigma, in other words; news media techniques of representing place and residents in a stigmatising manner. These consist of firstly grouping neighbourhoods together based on common traits; second, comparing and contrasting places with each other; and thirdly, racialised blame, which constructs ethnic minorities as problems. Mechanisms of stigma are placed in the context of dominant themes of news media reporting on stigmatised neighbourhoods, where we identified categories of hopelessness, violence and colonial representations as the most common framings of the news stories. In addition, the thematic analysis has allowed us to observe the increase of stories of violence and terrorism in news reports on stigmatised neighbourhoods, in turn connected to the overall inflation of islamophobia and nationalism, with focus on Muslims and Islam as threats to integration, safety and national unity.

Keywords
Stigmatisation, suburb, racialisation, colonialism, news media
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373394 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14
2. Who’s to blame? Segregation, policy and stigma in Swedish editorial discourse
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who’s to blame? Segregation, policy and stigma in Swedish editorial discourse
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Critical research on residential segregation has long emphasised issues of inequality and discrimination as crucial factors for its production and reproduction. Equally, research on spatial stigmatisation is recognised in scholarly debate as a highly problematic practice which not only shapes policy interventions but also affects the residents of targeted areas. With the ambition of problematising the relationship between residential segregation and stigmatisation, this article analyses printed newspaper editorial discourse in order to critically examine constructions of place. News media has been argued to be a key agent in the practice of stigmatisation, which makes editorial statements highly significant when it comes to how the newspaper perceives the importance of stigmatisation. In addition, the theoretical framework of residential segregation as a process based in structural inequalities provides the basis for identifying stigmatisation of poor and racialised neighbourhoods as an often neglected but indispensable piece of the puzzle. It is argued here that editorials’ neglect of practices of stigmatisation reproduce and simultaneously hide power relations inherent to processes of inequality.

Keywords
stigmatisation, segregation, policy, neighbourhood, media
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373395 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14
3. Decolonising residential segregation and “cultural difference”
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decolonising residential segregation and “cultural difference”
(English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In the context of Swedish anti-segregation strategies and area-based policies, this article critically examines how parliamentary motions create and reproduce a racialised understanding of housing segregation. A close examination of political language reveals a predominantly negative framing of both people and place, where already stigmatised areas are demonised as segregated places where the ‘immigrants’ live. In particular, the disadvantaged position of many of the residents in stigmatised areas is expressed through a consistent construction of non-‘Swedishness’; of not being considered part of Sweden based on perceived cultural difference framed as an individual or spatial attribute. In addition, the condition of not belonging is believed to merge with a condition of ‘utanförskap’, (‘outsiderness’). Despite the ideological differences between the various political parties, de-colonisation is still lacking in the Swedish political discourse on ethnic residential segregation.

Keywords
Segregation, ‘utanförskap’, racialisation, racism, poverty
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373396 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(485 kB)325 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 485 kBChecksum SHA-512
e57efe4fccd591b359a1562ac11d775c3ed77d4243961ef3b47d111d39094056b7ae1e309ea0c2f62f20282aa3d4512f9024d79755a2fb9d086c3dac67160381
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Social and Economic Geography
Social and Economic Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 325 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1429 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf