Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Validation of an MPC polymer coating to reduce surface-induced cascade system activation in whole blood in in vitroand in vivo models
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
Show others and affiliations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT

Background: Artificial surfaces that come into contact with blood (e.g., when used in various forms of biomedical device) induce an immediate activation of the cascade systems of the blood, the coagulation and complement systems. These reactions may lead to a thrombotic and/or inflammatory response that can eventually cause damage to the biomaterial or the patient, or to both. Multiple strategies to dampen these reactions have been employed, with heparin conjugation to the material surface being the most successfulthus far. Another approach to improving hemocompatibility is to use 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-based polymer coatings.

Experimental: In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of MPC polymer coating and compared it to a commercially available heparin coating in various in vitromodels using fresh human blood with the aim to replace the costly heparin-coated equipment with the more economic MPC. We then investigated the stability of the various coatings in human plasma in vitrofor 2 weeks. Finally, we inserted MPC polymer-coated catheters into the external jugular vein of pigs and monitored the catheters’ antithrombotic properties for 4 days.

Results: 1) There was no significant activation of platelets and of the coagulation and complement systems on the MPC polymer-coated or the commercially available heparin surface. 2) Both coats were superior in hemocompatibility to non-coated matrix surfaces. 3) The protective effect of the MPC polymer coat did not decline after incubation in plasma for up to 2 weeks. 4) With MPC polymer-coated catheters, it was possible to easily draw blood from experimental animals for 4 days, in contrast to the case for heparin-flushed commercially available non-coated catheters, in which substantial clotting was seen.

National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374153OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-374153DiVA, id: diva2:1280183
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2019-12-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records

Asif, SanaLindell, BjörnNilsson, BoTeramura, YujiNilsson Ekdahl, Kristina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Asif, SanaLindell, BjörnNilsson, BoTeramura, YujiNilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
By organisation
Clinical ImmunologyOral and Maxillofacial SurgeryDepartment of Immunology, Genetics and PathologySolid State Physics
Other Clinical Medicine

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 562 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf