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Is host heparanase required for the rapid spread of heparan sulfate binding viruses?
Australian Natl Univ, John Curtin Sch Med Res, ACRF Dept Canc Biol & Therapeut, Canc & Vasc Biol Grp, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Australian Natl Univ, John Curtin Sch Med Res, Dept Immunol & Infect Dis, Mol Mucosal Vaccine Immunol Grp, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Australian Natl Univ, John Curtin Sch Med Res, Dept Immunol & Infect Dis, Mol Mucosal Vaccine Immunol Grp, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Australian Natl Univ, John Curtin Sch Med Res, ACRF Dept Canc Biol & Therapeut, Canc & Vasc Biol Grp, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4255-3581
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2019 (English)In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 529, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vaccinia virus (VACV), like many other viruses, binds to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) prior to infecting cells. Since HS is ubiquitously expressed extracellularly, it seemed likely that VACV-HS interaction may impede virus spread, with host heparanase, the only known mammalian endoglycosidase that can degrade HS, potentially overcoming this problem. In support of this hypothesis, we found that, compared to wild type, mice deficient in heparanase showed a 1-3 days delay in the spread of VACV to distant organs, such as ovaries, following intranasal inoculation, or to ovaries and spleen following intramuscular inoculation. These delays in spread occurred despite heparanase deficiency having no effect on VACV replication at inoculation sites. Subsequent in vitro studies revealed that heparanase treatment released VACV from HS expressing, but not HS deficient, infected cell monolayers. Collectively these data suggest that VACV relies on host heparanase to degrade HS in order to spread to distant sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 529, p. 1-6
Keywords [en]
Vaccinia virus, Poxviruses, Heparanase, Heparan sulfate, Virus spread
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379334DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2019.01.001ISI: 000460195900001PubMedID: 30622027OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-379334DiVA, id: diva2:1297360
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Li, Jin-Ping

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