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Response expectancies shape the effect of SSRI treatment on serotonin and dopamine transporters in patients with social anxiety disorder
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2516-9075
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406310OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-406310DiVA, id: diva2:1412703
Available from: 2020-03-06 Created: 2020-03-06 Last updated: 2020-03-06
In thesis
1. Imaging serotonin and dopamine transporters in social anxiety disorder: Characterization, treatment and expectancy effects
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging serotonin and dopamine transporters in social anxiety disorder: Characterization, treatment and expectancy effects
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The monoamines serotonin and dopamine are likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of social anxiety and other affective disorders, but their respective contributions and putative interactions in the causes and cures of these disorders are still not well understood. It is also largely unknown if and how expectations of treatment success affect brain neurochemistry and neural activations, and if expectations interact with antidepressants like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). In this thesis some of these issues were addressed by use of positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Using the highly selective radiotracers [11C]DASB and [11C]PE2I to characterize the availability of serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporter proteins, study I compared non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND), probing the transporters, between patients with social anxiety disorder and healthy controls. Increased SERT binding was observed in the reward related region nucleus accumbens (NAcc), in the social anxiety group. Moreover, increased DAT binding was associated with severity of the disorder and social anxiety was also associated with higher SERT-DAT co-expression in fear- and reward-related areas, including the amygdala and NAcc. Study II showed that verbal instructions regarding expected treatment efficacy strongly affected the clinical outcome of SSRI-treatment. Overt treatment, when patients with social anxiety disorder were correctly informed, was vastly superior to covert SSRI treatment, when patients expected an ineffective placebo. Groups were also differentiated on objective brain activity measures. Study III further demonstrated different SERT and DAT binding changes in limbic and striatal areas with overt as compared to covert SSRI-treatment. Decreased DAT BPND in the striatum, as assessed with PET, correlated with improvement in the overt group, suggesting increased dopaminergic signalling. Study IV compared treatment-induced changes in SERT and DAT binding after cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with an SSRI or placebo in patients with social anxiety disorder. Both groups showed initial co-expression similar to study I. The SSRI+CBT and placebo+CBT combinations yielded dissimilar transporter change patterns. Higher SERT occupancy in the NAcc correlated with reduced symptoms and this relationship was moderated by the change in DAT BPND. The results of this thesis support that functional interactions between serotonin and dopamine modulate social anxiety symptomatology and are important brain targets for successful treatment. Further it demonstrates that the treatment success of SSRIs in social anxiety disorder depends on how the treatment is presented. These results can be informative for the practice of clinicians, but also highlights an ethical dilemma because a large portion of the total treatment effects is elicited by processes within the patient itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2020. p. 85
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 176
Keywords
PET, serotonin, dopamine, placebo, SSRI, CBT, MRI
National Category
Psychiatry Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Research subject
Psychology; Psychiatry; Radiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406312 (URN)978-91-513-0895-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-04-24, Sal XI, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
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Available from: 2020-04-02 Created: 2020-03-06 Last updated: 2020-05-19

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Hjorth, OlofFrick, AndreasGingnell, MalinMotilla Hoppe, JohannaFaria, VandaAlaie, ImanMånsson, Kristoffer N.T.Rosén, JörgenJonasson, MyLubberink, MarkAntoni, GunnarFredrikson, MatsFurmark, Tomas

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Hjorth, OlofFrick, AndreasGingnell, MalinMotilla Hoppe, JohannaFaria, VandaAlaie, ImanMånsson, Kristoffer N.T.Rosén, JörgenJonasson, MyLubberink, MarkAntoni, GunnarFredrikson, MatsFurmark, Tomas
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