Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Dental health of Vikings from Kopparsvik on Gotland
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Odontol, Dept Cariol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 551-556Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence, distribution, and location of dental caries were studied in complete and partial human dentitions dating from the Viking Age dating (900-1050 AD) excavated in Kopparsvik on island of Gotland, Sweden. 18 individuals and a total of 370 teeth were examined, using a strong light source and dental probe. Carious lesions were found in a large number of the individuals, 14 out of 18. The percentage of teeth affected by caries (11,9%) corresponds well with studied skull materials from the same period. The surface most susceptible to caries was the occlusal surface, whereas only a few proximal lesions and one single carious root surface was found. The tooth most commonly affected by caries was the mandibular first molar. The tooth most commonly missing ante-mortem was also the mandibular molar, and the tooth most commonly missing post mortem was the mandibular incisor. Other findings included apical infections, which were detected clinically in 3% of the teeth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley , 2020. Vol. 30, no 4, p. 551-556
Keywords [en]
caries, dental health, Gotland, Kopparsvik, tooth decay, Viking age
National Category
Dentistry Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-421092DOI: 10.1002/oa.2867ISI: 000562737400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-421092DiVA, id: diva2:1578322
Available from: 2020-10-06 Created: 2021-07-06 Last updated: 2023-04-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(768 kB)127 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 768 kBChecksum SHA-512
68bbe4e290f9e65645fa2b6b220626bf1c23076b04d8be4302253b75f8744450957c8196ae91b18f69cc865c998929dc2665b395ee2c837f961586094648c387
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Sten, Sabine

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sten, Sabine
By organisation
ArchaeologyDepartment of Archaeology and Ancient History
In the same journal
International journal of osteoarchaeology
DentistryArchaeology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 127 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 192 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf