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An empirical model to predict methane production in inland water sediment from particular organic matter supply and reactivity
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3251-7974
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7262-8911
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4634-527x
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2021 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 66, no 10, p. 3643-3655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The highest CH4 production rates can be found in anoxic inland water surface sediments however no model quantifies CH4 production following fresh particular organic matter (POM) deposition on anoxic sediments. This limits our capability of modeling CH4 emissions from inland waters to the atmosphere. To generate such a model, we quantified how the POM supply rate and POM reactivity control CH4 production in anoxic surface sediment, by amending sediment at different frequencies with different quantities of aquatic and terrestrial POM. From the modeled CH4 production, we derived parameters related to the kinetics and the extent of CH4 production. We show that the extent of CH4 production can be well predicted by the quality (i.e., C/N ratio) and the quantity of POM supplied to an anoxic sediment. In particular, within the range of sedimentation rates that can be found in aquatic systems, we show that CH4 production increases linearly with the quantity of phytoplankton-derived and terrestrially derived POM. A high frequency of POM addition, which is a common situation in natural systems, resulted in higher peaks in CH4 production rates. This suggests that relationships derived from earlier incubation experiments that added POM only once, may result in underestimation of sediment CH4 production. Our results quantitatively couple CH4 production in anoxic surface sediment to POM sedimentation flux, and are therefore useful for the further development of mechanistic models of inland water CH4 emission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021. Vol. 66, no 10, p. 3643-3655
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461035DOI: 10.1002/lno.11905ISI: 000681100700001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-461035DiVA, id: diva2:1618885
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 336642Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Understanding and predicting methane formation and bubble emission from lakes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding and predicting methane formation and bubble emission from lakes
2024 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The role of lakes and reservoirs as significant emitters of the potent greenhouse gas methane (CH4) to the atmosphere is well established, but several uncertainties remain particularly due to knowledge gaps in the relationship between CH4 dynamics and sediment characteristics, which limit our capabilities to provide robust estimates of CH4 fluxes from lakes. 

In my thesis, I investigated CH4 formation and CH4 bubble emissions (ebullition) in lakes, with a particular focus on sediment characteristics that control these processes, using different approaches such as laboratory experiments, field surveys and process-based modelling.

Sediment incubation experiments have revealed that CH4 formation rates can be predicted based on the age and total nitrogen content of the sediment. This relationship holds true across a wide range of sediment types found in various climates, ranging from alpine tundra to tropical regions, and can be effectively estimated by a common empirical model. Additionally, the supply and the quality of organic matter play a crucial role in determining the extent of CH4 formation in the sediment. Moreover, frequent additions of organic matter to surface sediment enhance the speed of CH4 formation rates. Importantly, the relationship between organic matter supply, its quality and frequency of addition with CH4 formation rates can be predicted with a logistic model. 

Field surveys conducted in a small eutrophic lake revealed that the spatial variability in CH4 ebullition is regulated by site-specific sediment characteristics: high CH4 ebullition rates were observed in areas characterized by elevated organic matter density in surface sediment and temporary sediment deposition, although no correlation was found with sediment accumulation rates.

The use of a 1D model to simulate CH4 fluxes from a lake demonstrated its ability to simulate fairly well the whole-lake average CH4 ebullition fluxes observed in the field, despite experiencing some interannual variability in model performance. However, when dividing the lake into smaller sections to simulate the observed longitudinal spatial variability in CH4 ebullition, the model systematically overestimated the fluxes. 

Overall, this thesis highlights the critical role of sediment characteristics and sedimentation regime on regulating the CH4 formation and ebullition fluxes, providing advancements in understanding CH4 dynamics in lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2024. p. 55
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 2390
Keywords
methane, carbon cycle, lakes, sediment, modelling, limnology
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences Geochemistry
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-526222 (URN)978-91-513-2100-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2024-05-30, Ekmansalen, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Norbyvägen 14, Uppsala, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2024-05-03 Created: 2024-04-05 Last updated: 2024-05-03

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Grasset, CharlotteMoras, SimoneIsidorova, AnastasijaLinkhorst, AnnikaSobek, Sebastian

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