uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Autonomous and the Passive Progressive in 20th-Century Irish
Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of English, Celtic Section.
2004 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present study deals with the use of two Irish verb constructions, the autonomous (e.g. cuireadh litreacha chun bealaigh, ‘letters were dispatched’) and the passive progressive (e.g. bhí m’athair á leigheas acu, ‘my father was being cured by them’), in a corpus of 20th-century texts. From this corpus, 2,956 instances of the autonomous and 467 instances of the passive progressive were extracted and included in the analysis. Dialectal variation concerning the use of these two constructions is also surveyed.

The study explores and compares the use of the autonomous and the passive progressive. The main aim of the study is to investigate the two constructions with regard to their textual functions. The features studied relate to verb and clause type, as well as the measuring of topicality of patients, implicit agents, and – in the passive progressive only – overt agents.

The autonomous tends to be used when the patient is topical, or central, in the text. The passive progressive, on the other hand, is mainly used with an overt agent that is considerably more topical than the patient. In agent-less passive progressives, patients and implicit agents are equally low in topicality. The autonomous occurs about equally often in main and subclauses, while the passive progressive is used primarily in subclauses, mainly non-finite ones. This difference is connected to the finding that 24% of the clauses containing the autonomous denote events as part of a sequentially ordered chain of events, compared to 4% of those containing the passive progressive.

The most salient dialectal variation concerns the frequency of the passive progressive: 73% of the instances of the passive progressive in the database occur in the Munster texts, compared to 22% in Connacht 5% in Ulster. The autonomous, in contrast, is fairly evenly distributed across the dialects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis , 2004. , p. 176
Series
Studia Celtica Upsaliensia, ISSN 1104-5515 ; 5
Keywords [en]
Celtic languages, autonomous, agent, corpus linguistics, impersonal, discourse function, Irish, passive, passive progressive, patient, topicality
Keywords [sv]
Keltiska språk
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Celtic Languages
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-4263ISBN: 91-554-5899-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-4263DiVA, id: diva2:164607
Public defence
2004-05-25, Ihresalen, Språkvetenskapligt centrum, Villavägen 4, Uppsala, 10:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2004-05-04 Created: 2004-05-04 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(766 kB)2106 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 766 kBChecksum MD5
3963e28d8d8dca5f934625668ec2d79b565a9d8d2b29e46212f62a2bd96f8da1ac8dff5c
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf
Buy this publication >>

By organisation
Celtic Section
Specific Languages

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 2106 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1511 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf