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Women’s education- perhaps one of the most powerful tools to reduce child mortality?: A cross-sectional study on the relationship between maternal education and childhood malaria prevention in Uganda
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
2023 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Malaria is one of the leading causes of child mortality in the world today. Almost half a million children die from the disease every year (OWID 2022). Uganda is currently one of few countries globally where more than 90 % of the population are at risk of malaria (Target Malaria 2023). Decades of academic research has shown that maternal education plays an important role in the reduction of malaria in children. Hence, this thesis seeks to further explore this relationship in Uganda by first examining how maternal education impacts children’s bed net use and if the effect depends on the level of wealth. Secondly, the aim is to also analyze if maternal education increases malaria knowledge. The methods used for this were the multiple regression model and the linear probability model. The results showed that when mothers went from having no education to at least some secondary education, children’s bed net use increased with 14.8% on average. Although not statistically significant, the importance of maternal education was 2.64% higher on average for poor mothers when they went from no education to at least some primary education. Lastly, knowledge about malaria increased 0.98% on average when mothers went from no education to at least some primary education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2023. , p. 44
Keywords [en]
Maternal education, childhood malaria, economic burden, Uganda, prevention, human capital theory, resource substitution theory
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-509440OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-509440DiVA, id: diva2:1789333
Subject / course
Economics
Educational program
Bachelor Programme in Business and Economics
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-18 Last updated: 2023-08-21Bibliographically approved

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