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A highly integratable silicon thermal gas flow sensor
Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Mikrosystemteknik. (ÅSTC)
Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Mikrosystemteknik. (ÅSTC)
Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Mikrosystemteknik. (ÅSTC)
Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Mikrosystemteknik. (ÅSTC)
2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 065015-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Thermal flow sensors have been designed, fabricated, and characterized. All bulk material in these devices is silicon so that they are integratable in silicon-based microsystems. To mitigate heat losses and to allow for use of corrosive gases, the heating and sensing thin film titanium/platinum elements, injecting and extracting heat, respectively, from the flow, are placed outside the channel on top of a membrane consisting of alternating layers of stress-balancing silicon dioxide and silicon nitride. For the fabrication, an unconventional bond surface protection method using sputter-deposited aluminum instead of thermal silicon dioxide is used in the process steps prior to silicon fusion bonding. A method for performing lift-off on top of the transparent membrane was also developed. The sensors, measuring 9.5 x 9.5 mm(2), are characterized in calorimetric and time-of-flight modes with nitrogen flow rates between 0 sccm and 300 sccm. The maximum calorimetric sensor flow signal and sensitivity are 0.95 mV and 29 mu V sccm(-1), respectively, with power consumption less than 40 mW. The time-of-flight mode is found to have a wider detectable flow range compared with calorimetric mode, and the time of flight measured indicates a response time of the sensor in the millisecond range. The design and operation of a sensor with high sensitivity and large flow range are discussed. A key element of this discussion is the configuration of the array of heaters and gauges along the channel to obtain different sensitivities and extend the operational range. This means that the sensor can be tailored to different flow ranges.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2012. Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 065015-
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Teknisk fysik med inriktning mot mikrosystemteknik
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-176814DOI: 10.1088/0960-1317/22/6/065015ISI: 000304609600015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-176814DiVA, id: diva2:537728
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-06-27 Laget: 2012-06-26 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-07bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Development of Microcomponents for Attitude and Communication Systems on Small Vehicles in Space and Extreme Environments
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Development of Microcomponents for Attitude and Communication Systems on Small Vehicles in Space and Extreme Environments
2013 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

In this thesis, components intended for vehicles in space and other extreme environments have been realized using microsystems technology to facilitate miniaturized, yet high-performing systems beneficial for small spacecraft and other vehicles with limited size and power.

Cold gas thrusters commonly used on spacecraft basically accelerate a gaseous propellant stored under high pressure. When miniaturized, their performance is reduced because of viscous forces. Here, with a special masking and etching scheme, making silicon micronozzles close to rotationally symmetric, this shortcoming was mitigated as indicated by schlieren imaging of the rocket exhaust and a comparison with conventionally manufactured micronozzles with rectangular cross-sections. Schlieren imaging was also used to detect leakage, quantify thrust vector deviation, and measure shock cell periods in the exhaust. Correlation was made to operational conditions.

Similarly operating zirconia thrusters with integrated heaters and flow sensors were developed to allow for higher operating temperature. Successful testing at 1000°C, suggests that the propellant efficiency could be increased by 7.5%, and also makes them candidates for chemical propulsion.

A silicon thruster operating in rarefied gas regimes was also developed. Being suspended in a silicon dioxide frame reducing heat losses, a total efficiency of 17% was reached.

Relating to the integrated micropropulsion systems, two types of flow sensors were developed. Through finite element modeling, the insertion of sensor fingers in the fluid was shown to be an interesting concept for high-pressure applications.

Utilizing the same principle, a velocity sensor for a miniaturized submersible was developed. With a power consumption below 15 mW, it was able to measure directions with an accuracy of ±8º, and speed with an error less than 22%.

To enable high-speed optical communication between spacecraft, a Free Space Optics communication system, and particularly its dual-axis beam-steering actuator, was developed. Through thermal actuation, optical angles larger than 40º were obtained. A lumped thermal model was used to study design changes, vacuum operation and feedback control.

Understanding and mastering heat transfer in microsystems have been vital in many of the studies conducted. Throughout, advanced micromachining and modeling have been used as a step towards high-performance systems for space and other extreme environments.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. s. 43
Serie
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1003
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Förvaltningsrätt
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-186862 (URN)978-91-554-8555-9 (ISBN)
Disputas
2013-01-11, Polhelmsalen, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, Uppsala, 10:00 (engelsk)
Veileder
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-12-21 Laget: 2012-11-29 Sist oppdatert: 2013-02-11bibliografisk kontrollert

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