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Noise correlation in PET, CT, SPECT and PET/CT data evaluated using autocorrelation function: a phantom study on data, reconstructed using FBP and OSEM.
Uppsala University, Interfaculty Units, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Interfaculty Units, Centre for Image Analysis. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis. Centrum för bildanalys. (Centrum för bildanalys)
Physics, Department of Physics. Physics, Department of Physics. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
Chemistry, Department of Chemistry. Chemistry, Department of Chemistry. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
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2005 (English)In: Bio Medical Central (BMC): Medical Imaging, Vol. 5, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Computed Tomography (CT), PET/CT and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) are non-invasive imaging tools used for creating two dimensional (2D) cross section images of three dimensional (3D) objects. PET and SPECT have the potential of providing functional or biochemical information by measuring distribution and kinetics of radiolabelled molecules, whereas CT visualizes X-ray density in tissues in the body. PET/CT provides fused images representing both functional and anatomical information with better precision in localization than PET alone.Images generated by these types of techniques are generally noisy, thereby impairing the imaging potential and affecting the precision in quantitative values derived from the images. It is crucial to explore and understand the properties of noise in these imaging techniques. Here we used autocorrelation function (ACF) specifically to describe noise correlation and its non-isotropic behaviour in experimentally generated images of PET, CT, PET/CT and SPECT. METHODS: Experiments were performed using phantoms with different shapes. In PET and PET/CT studies, data were acquired in 2D acquisition mode and reconstructed by both analytical filter back projection (FBP) and iterative, ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM) methods. In the PET/CT studies, different magnitudes of X-ray dose in the transmission were employed by using different mA settings for the X-ray tube. In the CT studies, data were acquired using different slice thickness with and without applied dose reduction function and the images were reconstructed by FBP. SPECT studies were performed in 2D, reconstructed using FBP and OSEM, using post 3D filtering. ACF images were generated from the primary images, and profiles across the ACF images were used to describe the noise correlation in different directions. The variance of noise across the images was visualised as images and with profiles across these images. RESULTS: The most important finding was that the pattern of noise correlation is rotation symmetric or isotropic, independent of object shape in PET and PET/CT images reconstructed using the iterative method. This is, however, not the case in FBP images when the shape of phantom is not circular. Also CT images reconstructed using FBP show the same non-isotropic pattern independent of slice thickness and utilization of care dose function. SPECT images show an isotropic correlation of the noise independent of object shape or applied reconstruction algorithm. Noise in PET/CT images was identical independent of the applied X-ray dose in the transmission part (CT), indicating that the noise from transmission with the applied doses does not propagate into the PET images showing that the noise from the emission part is dominant. The results indicate that in human studies it is possible to utilize a low dose in transmission part while maintaining the noise behaviour and the quality of the images. CONCLUSION: The combined effect of noise correlation for asymmetric objects and a varying noise variance across the image field significantly complicates the interpretation of the images when statistical methods are used, such as with statistical estimates of precision in average values, use of statistical parametric mapping methods and principal component analysis. Hence it is recommended that iterative reconstruction methods are used for such applications. However, it is possible to calculate the noise analytically in images reconstructed by FBP, while it is not possible to do the same calculation in images reconstructed by iterative methods. Therefore for performing statistical methods of analysis which depend on knowing the noise, FBP would be preferred.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 5, no 5
National Category
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-74266DOI: doi:10.1186/1471-2342-5-5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-74266DiVA: diva2:102176
Available from: 2005-09-19 Created: 2005-09-19 Last updated: 2011-01-11

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2342/5/5

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Razifar, PashaSandström, MattiasLångström, BengtBengtsson, Ewert
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Centre for Image AnalysisComputerized Image AnalysisDepartment of PhysicsDepartment of ChemistryDepartment of Neuroscience
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)

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