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Intralocus Sexual Conflict and the Tragedy of the Commons in Seed Beetles
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
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2016 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 188, no 4, E98-E112 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The evolution of male traits that inflict direct harm on females during mating interactions can result in a so-called tragedy of the commons, where selfish male strategies depress population viability. This tragedy of the commons can be magnified by intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) whenever alleles that reduce fecundity when expressed in females spread in the population because of their benefits in males. We evaluated this prediction by detailed phenotyping of 73 isofemale lines of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We quantified genetic variation in life history andmorphology, as well as associated covariance in male and female adult reproductive success. In parallel, we created replicated artificial populations of each line and measured their productivity. Genetic constraints limited independent trait expression in the sexes, and we identified several instances of sexually antagonistic covariance between traits and fitness, signifying IaSC. Population productivity was strongly positively correlated to female adult reproductive success but uncorrelated with male reproductive success. Moreover, male (female) phenotypic optima for several traits under sexually antagonistic selection were exhibited by the genotypes with the lowest (highest) population productivity. Our study forms a direct link between individuallevel sex-specific selection and population demography and places lifehistory traits at the epicenter of these dynamics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 188, no 4, E98-E112 p.
Keyword [en]
sexual selection, adaptation, sexual antagonism, sexual dimorphism, genetic architecture, population demography
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-305304DOI: 10.1086/687963ISI: 000383774400001PubMedID: 27622882OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-305304DiVA: diva2:1037796
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEU, European Research Council, AdG-294333; AGINGSEXDIFF
Available from: 2016-10-18 Created: 2016-10-14 Last updated: 2017-10-24Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sexual Selection and Adaptation to Novel Environments
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual Selection and Adaptation to Novel Environments
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The work included in this thesis aims at exploring the environmental sensitivity of benefits and costs of sexual selection through a combined empirical and theoretical effort, to increase our understanding of the impact of environmental change on sexually reproducing populations.Can sexual selection promote adaptation to novel environments? Sexual selection for good genes should accelerate adaptation by granting higher reproductive success to individuals of high genetic quality. However, sexual conflict is a frequent outcome of sexual reproduction and may often be detrimental to population fitness. Experimental evolution has shown that the role of sexual selection in adaptation is variable, because of a complex balance between the detrimental and beneficial effects described above.The present thesis is investigating the role of sexual selection in adaptation by focusing on the sex-specific strength of selection and the intensity of intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) in ancestral and novel environments. The sex-specific strength of selection is a valuable proxy for the benefits of sexual reproduction, since a male-bias in selection caused by sexual selection should allow efficient purging of deleterious alleles with little impact on female fecundity and cost to population fitness.This thesis investigates both sex-specific selection and IaSC across benign and novel environments in two species of seed beetles, Callosobruchus maculatus and Acanthoscelides obtectus, and includes a theoretical model of the effect of environmental change on of sexual selection. The empirical part of my results indicates that, generally, selection at the adult stage is male biased but that this male bias may be reduced under stress, pointing towards reduced benefits of sexual selection under rapid environmental change. Additional simulations suggest that the frequency dependent nature of sexual selection alone could explain this trend. No empirical support was found for the reduction of IaSC under stress.It is becoming crucial today to understand the impact of environmental change on natural populations. This thesis brings new material adding to our understanding of the role of sexual selection within that particular issue. The outcome of sexual selection is dependent on a variety of mechanisms, such as good genes processes and sexual conflict, which are very likely to be dependent on ecological factors and specificity of the system studied. For that reason, carefully controlled experiments on laboratory systems and mathematical modelling are necessary steps that should ultimately lead to the study of similar questions in natural systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. 40 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1590
Keyword
Sexual selection, Environmental change, Sexual conflict, Environmental stress, Adaptation, Adaptive landscape
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332119 (URN)978-91-513-0131-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-15, Lindhalsalen, Norbyväagen 18, 75236, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2017-11-22

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