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Poor breakfast habits in adolescence predict the metabolic syndrome in adulthood
Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
Umeå universitet, Allmänmedicin.
2015 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 18, no 1, 122-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To analyse whether poor breakfast habits in adolescence predict the metabolic syndrome and its components in adulthood. Previous studies suggest that regular breakfast consumption improves metabolic parameters. Design: Prospective. Breakfast habits and other lifestyle variables at age 16 years were assessed from questionnaires. Poor breakfast habits were defined as skipping breakfast or only drinking or eating something sweet. At age 43 years, the effective sample consisted of 889 participants defined as having the metabolic syndrome or not, using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and confidence intervals. Setting: The Northern Swedish Cohort, a longitudinal population-based cohort with 27-year follow-up. Subjects: Adolescents (age 16 years). Results: Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome at age 43 years was 27.0%. Of the participants, 9.9% were classified with poor breakfast habits at age 16 years. Adjusted odds for the metabolic syndrome at age 43 years was OR = 1.68 (95% CI 1.01, 2.78) for those with poor breakfast habits at age 16 years compared with breakfast eaters. Looking at the metabolic syndrome components, poor breakfast habits at age 16 years were associated with central obesity (OR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.00, 2.92) and high fasting glucose (OR = 1.75; 95% CI 1.01, 3.02) at age 43 years, even after multivariate adjustments. Conclusions: Poor breakfast habits in adolescence predicted the metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Of the metabolic syndrome components, poor breakfast habits in adolescence predicted central obesity and high fasting glucose in adulthood. Further research is needed to fully understand the relationship between early breakfast habits and adult metabolic syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 18, no 1, 122-129 p.
Keyword [en]
Breakfast, Metabolic syndrome, Life course
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309261DOI: 10.1017/S1368980013003509ISI: 000349759100015PubMedID: 24468205OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-309261DiVA: diva2:1051652
Available from: 2014-11-09 Created: 2016-12-02 Last updated: 2016-12-02

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