uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nitrous oxide emissions from streams in a Swedish agricultural catchment
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, POB 7050, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, POB 7014, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, POB 7014, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, ISSN 0167-8809, E-ISSN 1873-2305, Vol. 236, 295-303 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Excess nitrogen fertiliser in agricultural soils might be leached to streams and converted to the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). To assess the importance of N2O emissions from agricultural streams, concentration dynamics and emissions N2O emissions in streams were investigated in a 32 km2 lowland agricultural catchment located in Sweden. Dissolved N2O concentration was measured at nine occasions between December 2014 and August 2015 at nine stream stations. The stream stations represented sub-catchments with different land use characteristics with agricultural land use ranging from 0 to 63% of the area. Stream N2O percentage saturation ranged 40-2701% and showed large spatial and temporal variations. Statistical analysis using mixed models revealed that N2O concentration was significantly linked to nitrate concentration in the stream water, to the percentage arable land in the sub catchments as well as to the stream water discharge. Using two empirical equations to estimate the N2O emissions showed that streams were generally a source of N2O to the atmosphere (mean 108 and 175 mu g N m(-2) h(-1) with first and second equation). The catchment scale estimate of N2O stream emissions was compared to the estimate obtained using IPCC guidelines linking N fertilisation inputs and leaching to N2O emissions. The comparison suggested that N2O stream emission calculated using the IPCC methodology might be underestimated. A coarse estimate suggests that N2O stream emissions represent about 4% of the total N2O emissions from N-fertiliser at the catchment scale. Hence while streams covered only 0.1% of the catchment area they were of disproportionate importance as a source of N2O to the atmosphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 236, 295-303 p.
Keyword [en]
Greenhouse gas, River, Nitrogen pollution
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311867DOI: 10.1016/j.agee.2016.12.012ISI: 000392886700029OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-311867DiVA: diva2:1061701
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-1559
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2017-03-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wallin, Marcus B.Bishop, Kevin
By organisation
LUVAL
In the same journal
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 260 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf