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Recent Is More: A Negative Time-Order Effect in Nonsymbolic Numerical Judgment.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1326-6177
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, ISSN 0096-1523Print, Vol. 43, no 6, 1084-1097 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Humans as well as some nonhuman animals can estimate object numerosities—such as the number of sheep in a flock—without explicit counting. Here, we report on a negative time-order effect (TOE) in this type of judgment: When nonsymbolic numerical stimuli are presented sequentially, the second stimulus is overestimated compared to the first. We examined this “recent is more” effect in two comparative judgment tasks: larger–smaller discrimination and same–different discrimination. Ideal-observer modeling revealed evidence for a TOE in 88.2% of the individual data sets. Despite large individual differences in effect size, there was strong consistency in effect direction: 87.3% of the identified TOEs were negative. The average effect size was largely independent of task but did strongly depend on both stimulus magnitude and interstimulus interval. Finally, we used an estimation task to obtain insight into the origin of the effect. We found that subjects tend to overestimate both stimuli but the second one more strongly than the first one. Overall, our findings are highly consistent with findings from studies on TOEs in nonnumerical judgments, which suggests a common underlying mechanism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 43, no 6, 1084-1097 p.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317321DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000387ISI: 000402759300004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-317321DiVA: diva2:1081243
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2017-08-30Bibliographically approved

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Van den Berg, RonaldLindskog, MarcusPoom, LeoWinman, Anders

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