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Association of asthma and hay fever with irregular menstruation
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
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2005 (English)In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 60, no 6, 445-450 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that asthmatic women are more likely to have abnormal sex hormone levels. A study was undertaken to determine whether asthma and allergy were associated with irregular menstruation in a general population, and the potential role of asthma medication for this association. METHODS: A total of 8588 women (response rate 77%) participated in an 8 year follow up postal questionnaire study of participants of the ECRHS stage I in Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Only non-pregnant women not taking exogenous sex hormones were included in the analyses (n = 6137). RESULTS: Irregular menstruation was associated with asthma (OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.11 to 2.13)), asthma symptoms (OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.86)), hay fever (OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.57)), and asthma preceded by hay fever (OR 1.95 (95% CI 1.30 to 2.96)) among women aged 26-42 years. This was also observed in women not taking asthma medication (asthma symptoms: OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91); hay fever: OR 1.27 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.58); wheeze preceded by hay fever: OR 1.76 (95% CI 1.18 to 2.64)). Irregular menstruation was associated with new onset asthma in younger women (OR 1.58 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.42)) but not in women aged 42-54 years (OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.32 to 1.18)). The results were consistent across centres. CONCLUSIONS: Younger women with asthma and allergy were more likely to have irregular menstruation. This could not be attributed to current use of asthma medication. The association could possibly be explained by common underlying metabolic or developmental factors. The authors hypothesise that insulin resistance may play a role in asthma and allergy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 60, no 6, 445-450 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult, Asthma/*complications/epidemiology, Europe/epidemiology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Menstruation Disturbances/*complications/epidemiology, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Regression Analysis, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Rhinitis; Allergic; Seasonal/*complications/epidemiology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-80506DOI: 10.1136/thx.2004.032615PubMedID: 15923242OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-80506DiVA: diva2:108420
Available from: 2006-05-15 Created: 2006-05-15 Last updated: 2010-07-21Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15923242&dopt=Citation

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Jansson, ChristerJögi, Rain
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