uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women
Show others and affiliations
2005 (English)In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 97, no 3, 210-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI > or =35.0 kg/m2] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P(trend) across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P(trend) =.05). CONCLUSIONS: Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 97, no 3, 210-218 p.
Keyword [en]
Adult, Aged, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Confidence Intervals, Confounding Factors (Epidemiology), Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Incidence, Logistic Models, Lymphoma; B-Cell/epidemiology, Lymphoma; Large-Cell/epidemiology, Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin/*epidemiology/etiology, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/*complications, Odds Ratio, Questionnaires, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support; U.S. Gov't; P.H.S., Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Selection Bias, Sweden/epidemiology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-80560DOI: 10.1093/jnci/dji012PubMedID: 15687364OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-80560DiVA: diva2:108474
Available from: 2006-06-29 Created: 2006-06-29 Last updated: 2010-11-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=15687364&dopt=Citation

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Glimelius, Bengt
By organisation
Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology
In the same journal
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 163 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link