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Zodiacal exoplanets in time (ZEIT) - II. A 'super-Earth' orbiting a young K dwarf in the Pleiades Neighbourhood
Univ Hawaii Manoa, Dept Geol & Geophys, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
Univ Texas Austin, Dept Astron, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
Univ Texas Austin, Dept Astron, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
Univ Hawaii Manoa, Inst Astron, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA..
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2017 (English)In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 464, no 1, 850-862 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We describe a 'super-Earth'-size (2.30 +/- 0.16 R-circle plus)planet transiting an early K-type dwarf star in the Campaign 4 field observed by the K2 mission. The host star, EPIC 210363145, was identified as a candidate member of the approximately 120 Myr-old Pleiades cluster based on its kinematics and photometric distance. It is rotationally variable and exhibits near-ultraviolet emission consistent with a Pleiades age, but its rotational period is approximate to 20 d and its spectrum contains no H alpha emission nor the Li I absorption expected of Pleiades K dwarfs. Instead, the star is probably an interloper that is unaffiliated with the cluster, but younger (less than or similar to 1.3 Gyr) than the typical field dwarf. We ruled out a false positive transit signal produced by confusion with a background eclipsing binary by adaptive optics imaging and a statistical calculation. Doppler radial velocity measurements limit the companion mass to <2 times that of Jupiter. Screening of the light curves of 1014 potential Pleiades candidate stars uncovered no additional planets. An injection-and-recovery experiment using the K2 Pleiades light curves with simulated planets, assuming a planet population like that in the Kepler prime field, predicts only 0.8-1.8 detections (versus similar to 20 in an equivalent Kepler sample). The absence of Pleiades planet detections can be attributed to the much shorter monitoring time of K2 (80 d versus 4 yr), increased measurement noise due to spacecraft motion, and the intrinsic noisiness of the stars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017. Vol. 464, no 1, 850-862 p.
Keyword [en]
planets and satellites:general, stars:low-mass, planetary systems, open clusters and associations:individual:Pleiades
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319332DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stw2345ISI: 000393646300063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-319332DiVA: diva2:1086663
Available from: 2017-04-03 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2017-04-03Bibliographically approved

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