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Neutral and selective drivers of colour evolution in a widespread Australian passerine
Monash Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Clayton Campus, Melbourne, Vic 3800, Australia..
Monash Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Clayton Campus, Melbourne, Vic 3800, Australia..
Monash Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Clayton Campus, Melbourne, Vic 3800, Australia..
Australian Museum, Res Inst, 1 William St, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia..
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 44, no 3, 522-536 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimRump plumage coloration of the Eastern Yellow Robin (Eopsaltria australis), a widespread Australian songbird, varies from bright yellow in the tropical north to olive-green in the temperate south. Here, we test whether colour variation: (1) correlates most strongly with neutral genetic variation and so is best explained by historical processes, (2) reflects selection associated with different visual environments (dense versus open habitats) and/or (3) reflects selection associated with climatic variation. LocationEastern Australia. MethodsWe quantified colour variation using reflectance spectrometry and visual models. We performed geographical cline analysis of colour and neutral genetic variation (genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms). We tested for correlations of colour variation with climate, vegetation density, geographical location and genetic variation. We accounted for covariation and spatial autocorrelation, and conducted analyses at continental and regional spatial scales. ResultsClinal variation of colour traits and neutral genetic markers were largely concordant. At the continental scale, colour variation was strongly associated with neutral genetic structure and geography, and to a lesser extent with environment. At the regional scale, environmental variation was a better predictor of colour variation than it was at the larger scale. Main conclusionAt the continental scale, colour variation is strongly associated with large-scale population history. In contrast, at the regional scale, where the influence of history and geography is weaker, environmental variation has a role in facilitating the maintenance of colour variation. Our results highlight the need to assess selective and neutral alternatives at multiple spatial scales when studying geographical variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL , 2017. Vol. 44, no 3, 522-536 p.
Keyword [en]
adaptive, carotenoid, colour variation, melanin, neutral, path analysis, spatial autocorrelation
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319547DOI: 10.1111/jbi.12942ISI: 000395100600005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-319547DiVA: diva2:1087223
Funder
Australian Research Council, LP0776322 DE120102323
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2017-04-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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