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Kidnapping and Mental Health in Iraqi Refugees: The Role of Resilience
Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Wayne State Univ, Dept Psychol, 71 W Warren Ave, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Western Michigan Univ, Off Vice President Res, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;Univ Detroit Mercy, Dept Psychol, Detroit, MI 48221 USA..
Wayne State Univ, Sch Med, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA.;St Xavier Univ, Dept Psychol, Chicago, IL USA..
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 19, no 1, 98-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although kidnapping is common in war-torn countries, there is little research examining its psychological effects. Iraqi refugees (N = 298) were assessed upon arrival to the U.S. and 1 year later. At arrival, refugees were asked about prior trauma exposure, including kidnapping. One year later refugees were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression disorder (MDD) using the SCID-I. Individual resilience and narratives of the kidnapping were also assessed. Twenty-six refugees (9 %) reported being kidnapped. Compared to those not kidnapped, those who were had a higher prevalence of PTSD, but not MDD, diagnoses. Analyses examining kidnapping victims revealed that higher resilience was associated with lower rates of PTSD. Narratives of the kidnapping were also discussed. This study suggests kidnapping is associated with PTSD, but not MDD. Additionally, kidnapping victims without PTSD reported higher individual resilience. Future studies should further elucidate risk and resilience mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER , 2017. Vol. 19, no 1, 98-107 p.
Keyword [en]
Kidnapping, Refugees, Resilience, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Depression
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319648DOI: 10.1007/s10903-015-0340-8ISI: 000394213200013PubMedID: 26781328OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-319648DiVA: diva2:1087535
Available from: 2017-04-07 Created: 2017-04-07 Last updated: 2017-04-07Bibliographically approved

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Arnetz, Judith E.
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CiteExportLink to record
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