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Lactational exposure and neonatal kinetics of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in mice.
Medical Products Agency.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. (Pharmacometrics)
1999 (English)In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, E-ISSN 1096-0333, Vol. 154, no 2, 160-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentration of mercury in milk and the distribution pattern in the sucking pup was followed over time after administration of a single iv injection of 0.5 mg/kg body wt of 203Hg-labeled methylmercuric chloride or mercuric chloride to lactating mice on Day 10 of lactation. Mercury concentrations in milk of the dams and in whole body, blood, plasma, GI-tract, liver, kidneys, and brain of the offspring were followed up to 11 days after dosing (until lactational Day 21). Following the inorganic mercury dose to the dams, most of the mercury in milk was delivered to the pups during the first 24 h, but the maximum mercury concentration in plasma and tissues of pups was not reached until 7 days after dosing, indicating a prolonged absorption of inorganic mercury in the sucking pup. Pups of dams given methylmercury were exposed to a much lower and constant mercury concentration in milk. The estimated accumulated mercury dose via milk per pup of dams given methylmercury was less than half of that estimated after the inorganic mercury dose. When the accumulated dose via milk from methylmercury-exposed dams was compared to the amount of mercury in pup's carcass (whole body minus GI-tract including content), it was revealed that almost all mercury delivered via milk was absorbed, and that the suckling pups had a very low elimination of mercury until lactational Day 17. Lactational exposure following a maternal methylmercury or inorganic mercury dose resulted in almost similar mercury concentrations in liver, kidneys, and plasma of the suckling, but higher concentrations in brain (as most 14 times) and also twice as high mercury body burden in the methylmercury group. Thus, differences in kinetics indicate that lactational exposure of methylmercury is a greater hazard for the breast-fed infant than inorganic mercury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 154, no 2, 160-9 p.
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319912DOI: 10.1006/taap.1998.8566PubMedID: 9925800OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-319912DiVA: diva2:1087989
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-04-10

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