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Natal dispersers pay a lifetime cost to increased reproductive effort in a wild bird population
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Univ Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5558, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, F-69000 Lyon, France.;Univ Lyon 1, 18 Blvd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France.;Univ Lyon 2, Univ Lyon, F-69000 Lyon, France..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, Box 7044, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6566-2863
Univ Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5558, Lab Biometrie & Biol Evolut, F-69000 Lyon, France.;Univ Lyon 1, 18 Blvd 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1851, 20162445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natal dispersal is assumed to be costly. Such costs can be difficult to detect, and fitness consequences of dispersal are therefore poorly known. Because of lower phenotypic quality and/or familiarity with the environment, natal dispersers may be less buffered against a sudden increase in reproductive effort. Consequently, reproductive costs associated with natal dispersal may mostly be detected in harsh breeding conditions. We tested this prediction by comparing lifetime reproductive success between natal dispersers and non- dispersers in a patchy population of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) when they reared either a non- manipulated brood or an experimentally increased or decreased brood. Natal dispersers achieved lower lifetime reproductive success than non- dispersers only under more stressful breeding conditions (i. e. when brood size was experimentally increased). This was mostly due to a lower number of recruits produced in the year of the increase. Our results suggest a cost associated with natal dispersal paid immediately after an increase in reproductive effort and not subsequently compensated for through increased survival or future offspring recruitment. Natal dispersers adjusted their breeding investment when reproductive effort is as predicted but seemed unable to efficiently face a sudden increase in effort, which could affect the influence of environmental predictability on dispersal evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC , 2017. Vol. 284, no 1851, 20162445
Keyword [en]
reproductive success, return rate, natal dispersal, reproductive effort, dispersal cost, brood size manipulation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320036DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2445ISI: 000397884000009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-320036DiVA: diva2:1088566
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2017-04-13Bibliographically approved

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