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Sodium supply influences plasma sodium concentration and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia in extremely preterm infants
Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
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2017 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 455-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Hyper- and hyponatremia occur frequently in extremely preterm infants. Our purpose was to investigate plasma sodium (P-Na) concentrations, the incidence of hyper and hyponatremia, and the impact of possible predisposing factors in extremely preterm infants. METHODS: In this observational study, we analyzed data from the EXtremely PREterm (< 27wk.) infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS, n = 707). Detailed nutritional, laboratory, and weight data were collected retrospectively from patient records. RESULTS: Mean +/- SD P-Na increased from 135.5 +/- 3.0 at birth to 144.3 +/- 6.1 mmol/l at a postnatal age of 3 d and decreased thereafter. Fifty percent of infants had hypernatremia (P-Na > 145 mmol/l) during the first week of life while 79% displayed hyponatremia (P-Na < 135 mmol/l) during week 2. Initially, the main sodium sources were blood products and saline injections/infusions, gradually shifting to parenteral and enteral nutrition towards the end of the first week. The major deter, minant of P-Na and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia was sodium supply. Fluid volume provision was associated with postnatal weight change but not with P-Na. CONCLUSION: The supply of sodium, rather than fluid volume, is the major factor determining P-Na concentrations and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP , 2017. Vol. 81, no 3, p. 455-460
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Pediatrics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320874DOI: 10.1038/pr.2016.264ISI: 000396297000016PubMedID: 27935901OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-320874DiVA, id: diva2:1091158
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2017-04-26Bibliographically approved

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Ahlsson, FredrikÅgren, Johan

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