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B vitamins attenuate the epigenetic effects of ambient fine particles in a pilot human intervention trial.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 13, 3503-3508 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acute exposure to fine particle (PM2.5) induces DNA methylation changes implicated in inflammation and oxidative stress. We conducted a crossover trial to determine whether B-vitamin supplementation averts such changes. Ten healthy adults blindly received a 2-h, controlled-exposure experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m(3)) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m(3)) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. We profiled epigenome-wide methylation before and after each experiment using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip in peripheral CD4(+) T-helper cells. PM2.5 induced methylation changes in genes involved in mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism. B-vitamin supplementation prevented these changes. Likewise, PM2.5 depleted 11.1% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%, 21.7%; P = 0.04] of mitochondrial DNA content compared with sham, and B-vitamin supplementation attenuated the PM2.5 effect by 102% (Pinteraction = 0.01). Our study indicates that individual-level prevention may be used to complement regulations and control potential mechanistic pathways underlying the adverse PM2.5 effects, with possible significant public health benefit in areas with frequent PM2.5 peaks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 114, no 13, 3503-3508 p.
Keyword [en]
B vitamins, DNA methylation, air pollution, mitochondria
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Medical Genetics Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321813DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1618545114PubMedID: 28289216OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-321813DiVA: diva2:1094886
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2017-05-11

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