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Phosphorus limitation and heat stress decrease calcification in Emiliania huxleyi
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
2017 (English)In: Biogeosciences Discussions, ISSN 1810-6277, E-ISSN 1810-6285Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Calcifying haptophytes (coccolithophores) sequester carbon in the form of organic and inorganic cellular components (coccoliths). We examined the effect of phosphorus (P) limitation and heat stress on particulate organic and inorganic carbon (calcite) production in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Both environmental stressors are related to rising CO2 levels and affect carbon production in marine microalgae, which in turn impacts biogeochemical cycling. Using semi-continuous cultures, we show that P-limitation and heat stress decrease the calcification rate in E. huxleyi. This could lessen the ballasting effect of coccoliths and weaken carbon export out of the photic zone. However, using batch cultures, we show that different culturing approaches (batch versus semi-continuous) induce different physiologies. This affects the ratio of inorganic (PIC) to organic (POC) carbon and complicates general predictions on the effect of P-limitation on the PIC / POC ratio. Furthermore, heat stress increases P-requirements in E. huxleyi, possibly leading to lower standing stocks in a warmer ocean, especially if this is linked to lower nutrient input. In summary, the predicted rise in global temperature and resulting decrease in nutrient availability may first of all decrease CO2 sequestration by coccolithophores through lower overall carbon production. Secondly, the export of carbon may be diminished by a decrease in calcification and a weaker coccolith ballasting effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321897DOI: 10.5194/bg-2017-126OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-321897DiVA: diva2:1095088
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-11 Last updated: 2017-05-11

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2017-126/

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