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Adaptation to infectious disease exposure in indigenous Southern African populations
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Yale Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol Microbial Dis, New Haven, CT USA..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8160-9621
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1852, 20170226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genetic analyses can provide information about human evolutionary history that cannot always be gleaned from other sources. We evaluated evidence of selective pressure due to introduced infectious diseases in the genomes of two indigenous southern African San groups-the double dagger Khomani who had abundant contact with other people migrating into the region and the more isolated Ju vertical bar'hoansi. We used a dual approach to test for increased selection on immune genes compared with the rest of the genome in these groups. First, we calculated summary values of statistics that measure genomic signatures of adaptation to contrast selection signatures in immune genes and all genes. Second, we located regions of the genome with extreme values of three selection statistics and examined these regions for enrichment of immune genes. We found stronger and more abundant signals of selection in immune genes in the double dagger Khomani than in the Ju vertical bar'hoansi. We confirm this finding within each population to avoid effects of different demographic histories of the two populations. We identified eight immune genes that have potentially been targets of strong selection in the double dagger Khomani, whereas in the Juj'hoansi, no immune genes were found in the genomic regions with the strongest signals of selection. We suggest that the more abundant signatures of selection at immune genes in the double dagger Khomani could be explained by their more frequent contact with immigrant groups, which likely led to increased exposure and adaptation to introduced infectious diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC , 2017. Vol. 284, no 1852, 20170226
Keyword [en]
population genetics, human migrations, introduced diseases, immune genes, adaptation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322185DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2017.0226ISI: 000399294100022PubMedID: 28381615OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-322185DiVA: diva2:1096089
Funder
Wenner-Gren FoundationsGöran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologyKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved

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