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New possibilities using additive manufacturing with materials that are difficult to process and with complex structures
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Physics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
2017 (English)In: Physica Scripta, ISSN 0031-8949, E-ISSN 1402-4896, Vol. 92, no 5, 053002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) opens the possibility of creating new designs and manufacturing objects with new materials rapidly and economically. Particularly for use with polymers and polymer composites, simple printers can make high quality products, and these can be produced easily in offices, schools and in workshops and laboratories. This technology has opened a route for many to test ideas or to make custom devices. It is possible to easily manufacture complex geometries that would be difficult or even impossible to create with traditional methods. Naturally this technology has attracted attention in many fields that include the production of medical devices and prostheses, mechanical engineering as well as basic sciences. Materials that are highly problematic to machine can be used. We illustrate process developments with an account of the production of printer parts to cope with polymer fillers that are hard and abrasive; new nozzles with ruby inserts designed for such materials are durable and can be used to print boron carbide composites. As with other materials, complex parts can be printed using boron carbide composites with fine structures, such as screw threads and labels to identify materials. General ideas about design for this new era of manufacturing customised parts are presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP PUBLISHING LTD , 2017. Vol. 92, no 5, 053002
Keyword [en]
additive manufacturing, materials, 3D printing, composites
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322706DOI: 10.1088/1402-4896/aa694eISI: 000399888000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-322706DiVA: diva2:1100910
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved

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Olsson, AndersHellsing, Maja S.Rennie, Adrian R.

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