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Rapamycin additively extends lifespan in short- and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5602-1933
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9284-3459
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
2017 (English)In: Experimental Gerontology, ISSN 0531-5565, E-ISSN 1873-6815, Vol. 90, p. 79-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite tremendous progress in finding genes that, when manipulated, affects lifespan, little is known about the genetics underlying natural variation in lifespan. While segregating genetic variants for lifespan has been notoriously difficult to find in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), a complementary approach is to manipulate key genetic pathways in lines that differ in lifespan. If these candidate pathways are down regulated in long-lived lines, these lines can be predicted to respond less to pharmaceutical down-regulation of these pathways than short-lived lines. Experimental studies have identified the nutrient-sensing pathway TOR as a key regulator of lifespan in model organisms, and this pathway can effectively be down regulated using the drug rapamycin, which extends lifespan in all tested species. We expose short-and long-lived lines of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to rapamycin, and investigate if long-lived lines, which are hypothesized to already have down-regulated TOR signaling, respond less to rapamycin. We found no interaction between line and rapamycin treatment, since rapamycin extended lifespan independent of the intrinsic lifespan of the lines. This shows that rapamycin is equally effective on long and short-lived lines, and suggests that the evolution of long life may involve more factors that down-regulation of TOR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 90, p. 79-82
Keywords [en]
Experimental evolution, Lifespan, Rapamycin, TOR
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Animal Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321343DOI: 10.1016/j.exger.2017.01.017ISI: 000398012100010PubMedID: 28119053OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-321343DiVA, id: diva2:1103878
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEU, European Research CouncilAvailable from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-05-31Bibliographically approved

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Lind, Martin I.Chen, Hwei-yenCortazar-Chinarro, MariaMaklakov, Alexei A.

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