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No long-term trends in pCO2 despite increasing organic carbon concentrations in boreal lakes, streams and rivers
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
2017 (English)In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 31, no 6, 985-995 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from terrestrial sources have been increasing in freshwaters across large parts of the boreal region. According to results from large-scale field and detailed laboratory studies, such a DOC increase could potentially stimulate carbon dioxide (CO2) production, subsequently increasing the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in freshwaters. However, the response of pCO2 to the presently observed long-term increase in DOC in freshwaters is still unknown. Here we tested whether the commonly found spatial DOC-pCO2 relationship is also valid on a temporal scale. Analyzing time series of water chemical data from 71 lakes, 30 streams, and 4 river mouths distributed across all of Sweden over a 17 year period, we observed significant DOC concentration increases in 39 lakes, 15 streams, and 4 river mouths. Significant pCO2 increases were, however, only observed in six of these 58 waters, indicating that long-term DOC increases in Swedish waters are disconnected from temporal pCO2 trends. We suggest that the uncoupling of trends in DOC concentration and pCO2 are a result of increased surface water runoff. When surface water runoff increases, there is likely less CO2 relative to DOC imported from soils into waters due to a changed balance between surface and groundwater flow. Additionally, increased surface water runoff causes faster water flushing through the landscape giving less time for in situ CO2 production in freshwaters. We conclude that pCO2 is presently not following DOC concentration trends, which has important implications for modeling future CO2 emissions from boreal waters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2017. Vol. 31, no 6, 985-995 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323413DOI: 10.1002/2016GB005539ISI: 000405103600004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-323413DiVA: diva2:1106159
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 643052Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-10-10Bibliographically approved

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Nydahl, AnnaWallin, Marcus B.Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.

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