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Perception of Verbal and Nonverbal Emotional Signals in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: Evidence of a Negative Bias and an Increased Reliance on Nonverbal Cues
Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Med Ctr, Calwerstr 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Med Ctr, Calwerstr 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Med Ctr, Calwerstr 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Eberhard Karls Univ Tubingen, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Med Ctr, Calwerstr 14, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579X, E-ISSN 1943-2763, Vol. 31, no 2, 221-231 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies conducted in patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have documented a variety of anomalies concerning patients' abilities to interpret emotional signals. Attempting to clarify the bases of these anomalies, the current literature draws attention to a possible role of dysfunctional expectations, such as the expectation of social rejection. Dysfunctional expectations, however, may not only bias social interpretations, but may also focus attention on social cues most important in conveying emotional messages, such as nonverbal signals. To explore these assumptions, 30 female BPD patients were tasked to judge the valence of emotional states conveyed by combinations of verbal and nonverbal emotional cues. Compared to controls, BPD patients exhibited a negative bias in their interpretations and relied more on available nonverbal cues. Shifts in the relative importance of nonverbal cues appeared to be rooted mainly in a reduced reliance on positive verbal cues presumably deemed less credible by BPD patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 31, no 2, 221-231 p.
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Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322845DOI: 10.1521/pedi_2016_30_245ISI: 000400126700006PubMedID: 27064854OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-322845DiVA: diva2:1106506
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2017-06-07Bibliographically approved

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Wolf-Arehult, Martina

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