uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Whose side are you on? Government bias, intervention and the recurrence of communal conflict
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5673-9056
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How does armed intervention by the central government in a communal conflict affect the risk of renewed violence in the future? While a growing research field documents the structural and political origins of communal violence, we still know little about the factors that make renewed violence more or less likely once a conflict has ended. While some see communal conflict as the result of failed security provision by the state, government interventions in these conflicts do not always lead to a reduced risk of violence in the future. I argue that government bias in relation to the conflict parties affects the impact of armed intervention on the risk of future violence; in turn, the impact will be different depending on whether this bias reflects the local power dynamics. Specifically, I expect that when the government intervenes in favour of a group that is a political ally at the national level, the outcome will reinforce the dominance of that group, decreasing the risk of recurrence; however, if the government intervenes and seeks to weaken a politically threatening group, this will upset the local power balance, thus increasing the risk of recurrence. I rely on previous research on ethnic power relationships to theorize about the conditions under which these dynamics arise. Multivariate regression analysis of data covering sub-Saharan Africa 1989–2011 provides support for my arguments, contributing to our understanding of the role of local and central power relationships in communal conflict. 

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-324925DiVA: diva2:1112251
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-20

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Elfversson, Emma
By organisation
Department of Peace and Conflict Research
Political Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 19 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf