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Ethnic armies and one-sided violence during democratization: a comparative study of Benin and Togo
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This thesis presents a new way of looking at ethnicity and one-sided violence by investigating how incentives of the state armed forces matter for the risk of state-perpetrated one-sided violence. It asks the question: why do some countries experience state-perpetrated one-sided violence, while others do not? It argues that the matching of ethnic identity between a chief executive and the armed forces induces the armed forces with a fear of losing exclusive privileges and fearing ethnically motivated retaliation if the chief executive is ousted, which increases the risk of one-sided violence against threatening political opposition. It hypothesizes that countries with ethnically matched state armed forces have a higher risk of experiencing state-perpetrated one-sided violence than countries with non-matched state armed forces. The argument is tested using a structured focused comparison of Benin and Togo 1989-2006. The results suggest that ethnically matched armed forces employ one-sided violence to safeguard their exclusive privileges and neutralize risk of ethnically motivated retaliation, even without widespread ethnic grievances present in society. The study also discusses how ethnic matching can vary with politicization of ethnic identity, and that timing of one-sided violence could be explained by an increased group cohesion in ethnically matched armed forces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 55 p.
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324943OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-324943DiVA: diva2:1112364
Subject / course
Peace and Conflict Studies
Educational program
Master Programme in Peace and Conflict Studies
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-20Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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