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Why Not All Roads Lead to Rome: State Strength and Ratification of the International Criminal Court Treaty
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

If the International Criminal Court can take fundamental rights away from its member states, why have so many countries voluntarily joined nevertheless? This question has still not been fully answered since the ICC was established in 1998. I argue that states without an obvious interest in promoting the international criminal law regime, and that may be at risk of experiencing ICC intervention, find a reason to join the Court in the ability to manipulate its proceedings and as a result harming the reputation of potential domestic challengers to their authority. This applies particularly to relatively weak states, as higher state capability makes the choice to rely on own abilities in the event of (violent) challenges to authority more likely, and the prospect of ICC intervention more harmful. Logistic regression models lend moderate support for the hypotheses that higher state capability, as measured by on the Composite Index of National Capabilities (CINC) and military per capita values, leads to a lower likelihood of joining. The hypothesis that these variables have stronger effects among states with a past of conflict yields mixed results. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 51 p.
Keyword [en]
International Criminal Court, ratification, state capability, international criminal law regime
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-325164OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-325164DiVA: diva2:1113366
Subject / course
Peace and Conflict Studies
Educational program
Master Programme in Peace and Conflict Studies
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved

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