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Characterisation of oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica in the zebrafish embryo
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Saprolegnia parasitica belongs to the oomycetes, a group of fungus-like organisms. The group includes many pathogens, and are able to release motile zoospores, which enables them to find new hosts. S. parasitica can infect fish, crayfish and amphibians, and costs the aquaculture industry millions of dollars yearly. S. parasitica can be found worldwide, and presents a threat to natural ecosystems. It is generally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen, but virulence varies between strains. S. parasitica remain understudied, and the mechanisms behind the infection little understood. To learn more, and investigate the host immune response to S. parasitica infection, the zebrafish embryo was tried as a model. Transgenic lines with fluorescently-labelled immune cells was used for characterizing the innate immune response. The embryos were mostly resistant to the infection under normal conditions. Temperature was found to be the most important influence on mortality rates, with zoospore concentration, age of the embryo and strain only having an observable at 20°C. Important sites for primary infection were found to be the fins, tail, mouth and urogenital tract. Both neutrophils and macrophages were found to be recruited to the infection sites. Neutrophils were found to reach the infection site before macrophages. It was observed that the infection induces ROS production in all tissues of the embryos, with especially high amounts around the sites of infection. More research is needed to validate these results, but they can contribute to a better understanding of S. parasitica infection. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 33 p.
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-326337OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-326337DiVA: diva2:1120626
External cooperation
Exeter University
Educational program
Master Programme in Infection Biology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2017-11-02Bibliographically approved

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