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On the Evolution of Primary Institutions of International Society
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2017 (English)In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 623-630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

English School theorists argue that primary institutions uphold order in international society. However, they disagree about what those primary institutions are. Moreover, comparatively little research tackles the links between primary institutions and secondary ones, embodied in international organizations. Yet, these different levels of international institutions contribute in specific ways to change and stability in international affairs. I argue that primary institutions should be understood as practice-based and continuously discursively constructed. This opens up the possibility to show how international organizations, although created by states, can themselves shape primary institutions. I illustrate my argument with examples from the UN Security Council. There are manifest tensions in the Security Council between the evolving primary institution of great power management, and the “frozen” secondary institution of membership rules, leading to the lock-in of the primary institution. Moreover, this type of tension between institutions, rather than stability and harmony among them, should be acknowledged as the normal state of affairs in international society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 61, no 3, p. 623-630
Keywords [en]
international relations, English School theory, international society, primary insitutions
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327968DOI: 10.1093/isq/sqx039ISI: 000419594100011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-327968DiVA, id: diva2:1131418
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Change, Institutions, and International Organisations: Essays on the English School of International Relations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Change, Institutions, and International Organisations: Essays on the English School of International Relations
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall topic of this thesis is the English School understanding of international order, which I approach specifically by analysing the English School idea of international institutions and their change. The purpose is to develop the theory in a meta-theoretically conscious and coherent way. The three essays in this volume are independent in relation to each other, yet in some ways cumulative. Essays I and II aim to address primarily the question of how to conceptualise the current international order of multilateralism and international organisations. Essay I uses the empirical issue of UN reform to formulate one English School conceptualisation of international order, building specifically on the School’s central theme of international institutions. Essay II theoretically develops the tools of the English School for capturing how international institutions, according to English School theory the fundaments of international order, might change. Essay III approaches the meta-theoretical question of how change itself is understood in the English School, and how different theoretical readings of what we might mean by change give rise to different approaches to the normative question of what might be improvement in the international order. I argue that an internally coherent understanding of change in international society should emphasise change in institutions, made intelligible by ex-post narratives which contribute to establishing the discursive connection between practices and their normative legitimation, and guided by a sustained normative debate on the nature of improvement. This understanding of change signifies a much-needed addition to the English School toolbox, and brings a promise of a meta-theoretical grounding of the theory. In addition, it opens for similar theoretical inquiries into other IR theories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. p. 79
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 146
Keywords
international relations, English School theory, international society, change, the United Nations, primary institutions
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327970 (URN)978-91-513-0034-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-07, Brusewitzsalen (sal 3312), Östra Ågatan 19, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-01-13

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