uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hormonal Cycle and Contraceptive Effects on Amygdala and Salience Resting-State Networks in Women with Previous Affective Side Effects on the Pill
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mechanisms linking ovarian hormones to negative affect are poorly characterized, but important clues may come from the examination of the brain/'s intrinsic organization. Here, we studied the effects of both the menstrual cycle and oral contraceptives (OCs) on amygdala and salience network resting-state functional connectivity using a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled design. Hormone levels, depressive symptoms, and resting-state functional connectivity were measured in 35 healthy women (24.9[plusmn]4.2 years) who had previously experienced OC-related negative affect. All participants were examined in the follicular phase of a baseline cycle and in the third week of the subsequent cycle during treatment with either a combined OC (30[thinsp][mu]g ethinyl estradiol/0.15[thinsp]mg levonorgestrel) or placebo. The latter time point targeted the midluteal phase in placebo users and steady-state ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel concentrations in OC users. Amygdala and salience network connectivity generally increased with both higher endogenous and synthetic hormone levels, although amygdala-parietal cortical connectivity decreased in OC users. When in the luteal phase, the naturally cycling placebo users demonstrated higher connectivity in both networks compared with the women receiving OCs. Our results support a causal link between the exogenous administration of synthetic hormones and amygdala and salience network connectivity. Furthermore, they suggest a similar, potentially stronger, association between the natural hormonal variations across the menstrual cycle and intrinsic network connectivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology , 2017.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-328938DiVA: diva2:1138520
Note

Original Article; Supplementary information available for this article at http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/suppinfo/npp2017157s1.html

Available from: 2017-09-05 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2017-09-05

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.157

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Engman, JonasFredrikson, MatsGingnell, Malin
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
Neuropsychopharmacology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 74 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf