uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Brain cortisol receptor expression differs in Arctic charr displaying opposite coping styles
Uni Res AS, Uni Environm, Bergen, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Biosci, Oslo, Norway..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, Umea, Sweden..
Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Food Safety & Infect Biol, Oslo, Norway..
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 177, 161-168 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individually consistent behavioral and physiological responses to stressful situations (often referred to as coping styles) has been reported in many animal species. Differences in hypothalamic-pituitary axis reactivity characterize individuals, and it has been proposed that the glucocorticoid (gr) and mineralocorticoid (mr) receptors are fundamental in regulating coping styles. We sorted individuals into reactive and proactive coping styles by collapsing behavioral outputs from net restraint and confinement stress tests in a principal component analysis. We then analyzed plasma cortisol levels, serotonin neurochemistry and the relative mRNA expression of gr1 and mr in stressed individuals per coping style. Proactive fish were characterized as having a lower serotonergic activity and being more active under stress. In addition, proactive fish had higher hypothalamic gr1 and mr abundance and a higher mr/gr1 ratio, compared to reactive fish. We found no significant differences in cortisol or telencephalic mRNA, gr1 and mr expression, or their ratio. Brain MR and GR have been proven to have an important role in the appraisal, coping and adaptation to stressful stimuli, so that a higher expression of these receptors in proactive fish suggests increased tolerance and performance under stress, compared to reactive individuals. We present evidence of a conserved neuroendocrine mechanism associated with coping styles in a fish species which is ecologically very diverse and considered to be the most cold-adapted fish in freshwater. We propose that this may be a first step into exploiting this model in order to better understand climate-change related effects in sub populations and ecophenotypes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD , 2017. Vol. 177, 161-168 p.
Keyword [en]
Behavior, Cortisol, Glucocorticoid receptor, Mineralocorticoid receptor
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328963DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.04.024ISI: 000403993900022PubMedID: 28461088OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-328963DiVA: diva2:1140644
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-888
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-12 Last updated: 2017-09-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Winberg, Svante

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Winberg, Svante
By organisation
Physiology
In the same journal
Physiology and Behavior
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 84 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf