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Segmentation of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in the human brain: A white matter dissection and diffusion tensor tractography study
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
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2017 (English)In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract The inferior longitudinal fascicle (ILF) is one of the major occipital-temporal association pathways. Several studies have mapped its hierarchical segmentation to specific functions. There is, however, no consensus regarding a detailed description of ILF fibre organisation. The aim of this study was to establish whether the ILF has a constant number of subcomponents. A secondary aim was to determine the quantitative diffusion proprieties of each subcomponent and assess their anatomical trajectories and connectivity patterns. A white matter dissection of 14 post-mortem normal human hemispheres was conducted to define the course of the ILF and its subcomponents. These anatomical results were then investigated in 24 right-handed, healthy volunteers using in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and streamline tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA), volume, fibre length and the symmetry coefficient of each fibre group were analysed. In order to show the connectivity pattern of the ILF, we also conducted an analysis of the cortical terminations of each segment. We confirmed that the main structure of the ILF is composed of three constant components reflecting the occipital terminations: the fusiform, the lingual and the dorsolateral-occipital. ILF volume was significantly lateralised to the right. The examined indices of ILF subcomponents did not show any significant difference in lateralisation. The connectivity pattern and the quantitative distribution of ILF subcomponents suggest a pivotal role for this bundle in integrating information from highly specialised modular visual areas with activity in anterior temporal territory, which has been previously shown to be important for memory and emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
DTT, ILF, White matter, Occipital-temporal connectivity, Social cognition, Visual memory
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329445OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-329445DiVA: diva2:1141548
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2017-09-15

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http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899317303864

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Fredrikson, MatsÅhs, Fredrik
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