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Born Small for Gestational Age and Poor School Performance – How Small Is Too Small?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (obstetrik)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4427-1075
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. (obstetrik)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (obstetrik)
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. (pediatrik)
2017 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 88, 215-223 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To assess the relationship between severity of small for gestational age (SGA) and risk of poor school performance, and to investigate whether adult stature modifies this risk.

Methods: 1,088,980 term Swedish children born 1973-1988 were categorized into severe SGA (<-3 standard deviations (SD) of expected birth weight), moderate SGA (-2.01 to -3 SD), mild SGA (-1.01 to -2 SD) and appropriate for gestational age (-1 to 0.99 SD). Risk of poor school performance at time of graduating from compulsory school (grades <10th percentile) was calculated using unconditional logistic regression models and adjusted for socioeconomic factors. In a sub-analysis, we stratified boys by adult stature, and adjusted for maternal but not paternal height.

Results: All SGA groups were significantly associated with increased risk of poor school performance, with adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) ranging from 1.85 (1.65-2.07) for severe SGA to 1.25 (1.22-1.28) for mild SGA. In the sub-analysis, all birth weight groups were associated with increased risk of poor school performance among boys with short staturecompared with non-short stature.

Conclusion: Mild SGA is associated with significantly increased risk of poor school performance, and the risk increases with severity of SGA. Further, this risk diminishes after adequate catch-up growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 88, 215-223 p.
Keyword [en]
Small for gestational age, intrauterine growth, cognitive development, catch-up growth, stature
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330118DOI: 10.1159/000477905OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-330118DiVA: diva2:1144364
Projects
Perspectives on Intrauterine Growth and Perinatal Exposure
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2017-10-05Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2018-07-11 00:01
Available from 2018-07-11 00:01

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Lindström, LindaBergman, Eva

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