uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Interplay Between Fat Mass and Fat Distribution as Determinants of the Metabolic Syndrome Is Sex-Dependent
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2335-8542
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
2017 (English)In: Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, ISSN 1540-4196, E-ISSN 1557-8518, Vol. 15, no 7, 337-343 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fat mass and fat distribution are major determinants of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the interplay between them has not been thoroughly investigated. In addition, fat mass and fat distribution are generally different in men than in women. We aimed to determine whether the interplay between fat mass and fat distribution regarding MetS and its components is sex-dependent using data from the large-scale population-based sample EpiHealth. Methods: Occurrence of MetS and its components was determined together with fat mass by bioimpedance in 19,094 participants in the EpiHealth sample [mean age 61 years (SD 8.5), 56% females]. MetS was defined by the NCEP/ATPIII-criteria. Results: MetS prevalence was 23.0%. Fat mass (percent of body weight) was more strongly related to MetS (and the number of MetS components) in men than in women (P<0.0001 for interaction term) and in those with a high compared with those with a low waist/hip ratio (WHR). This modulating effect of WHR on the fat mass versus MetS-relationship was more pronounced in women than in men (P<0.0001 for interaction term). When analyzing the MetS components one by one, fat mass was more closely related to all the individual MetS criteria in men than in women, except for the glucose criteria. Conclusions: Fat mass is more closely related to prevalent MetS in men than in women, but the modulating effect of an abdominal type of fat distribution on the fat mass versus MetS-relationship is stronger in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC , 2017. Vol. 15, no 7, 337-343 p.
Keyword [en]
obesity, fat mass, metabolic syndrome, waist, hip ratio, fat distribution
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330540DOI: 10.1089/met.2017.0006ISI: 000408495600003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-330540DiVA: diva2:1146844
Funder
Epidemiology for health (EpiHealth): for Innovation and Excellence in Open-Access, Basic-Translational and Applied Epidemiological Research
Available from: 2017-10-04 Created: 2017-10-04 Last updated: 2017-10-04

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Lind, LarsÄrnlöv, JohanLampa, Erik

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lind, LarsÄrnlöv, JohanLampa, Erik
By organisation
Cardiovascular epidemiologyUCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center
In the same journal
Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 32 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf