uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The expression of opioid genes in non-classical reward areas depends on early life conditions and ethanol intake.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1668, 36-45 p., S0006-8993(17)30195-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The young brain is highly sensitive to environmental influences that can cause long-term changes in neuronal function, possibly through altered gene expression. The endogenous opioid system continues to mature after birth and because of its involvement in reward, an inadequate maturation of this system could lead to enhanced susceptibility for alcohol use disorder. Recent studies show that the classical reward areas nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area are less affected by early life stress whereas endogenous opioids in non-classical areas, e.g. dorsal striatum and amygdala, are highly responsive. The aim was to investigate the interaction between early life conditions and adult voluntary ethanol intake on opioid gene expression. Male Wistar rats were exposed to conventional rearing, 15, or 360min of daily maternal separation (MS) postnatal day 1-21, and randomly assigned to ethanol or water drinking postnatal week 10-16. Rats exposed to early life stress (MS360) had increased opioid receptor gene (Oprm1, Oprd1 and Oprk1) expression in the dorsal striatum. Ethanol drinking was associated with lower striatal Oprd1 and Oprk1 expression solely in rats exposed to early life stress. Furthermore, rats exposed to early life stress had high inherent Pomc expression in the amygdala but low expression after ethanol intake. Thus, adverse events early in life induced changes in opioid gene expression and also influenced the central molecular response to ethanol intake. These long-term consequences of early life stress can contribute to the enhanced risk for excessive ethanol intake and alcohol use disorder seen after exposure to childhood adversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 1668, 36-45 p., S0006-8993(17)30195-6
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330917DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.05.006PubMedID: 28511993OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-330917DiVA: diva2:1147641
Available from: 2017-10-06 Created: 2017-10-06 Last updated: 2017-10-06

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Department of Neuroscience
In the same journal
Brain Research
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 43 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf